Browse Exhibits (20 total)

Canadian Intelligence Activities in Vietnam

This briefing book includes documents cited in Timothy Andrews Sayle's "'But the Story Was True': A Research Note on Canadian Intelligence Activities in Vietnam," published in the Canadian Historical Review.

The documents on the left hand side of this page correspond with the Canada Declassified identifiers in the article's footnotes.

The article is available online at https://www.utpjournals.press/doi/full/10.3138/chr-2021-0007

Article abstract:

Recently declassified records reveal new information and confirm old assumptions about Canadian intelligence activities in Vietnam during the 1950s and 1960s. These records are now available online at Canada Declassified. This research note describes the new evidence and considers its implications for existing historiography regarding Canada and the International Commission for Supervision and Control and Canadian policy towards the American war in Vietnam. It suggests new opportunities for research on Canadian intelligence activities during the Cold War. More broadly, the note responds to the discussion in the Canadian Historical Review’s December 2015 issue (volume 96, number 4) regarding the future study of Canada’s diplomatic history and international action by suggesting that Canadian intelligence activities should be considered by scholars crafting narratives of Canadian international history.

The primary documents on this site were requested and made available by the Canadian Foreign Intelligence History Project. Fore more information about CFIHP, please visit https://carleton.ca/csids/canadian-foreign-intelligence-history-project/.

Canada's Cold War Defectors

This briefing book includes documents cited in Timothy Andrews Sayle's "We Now Know... A Little Bit More: Canada's Cold War Defectors," published in the International Journal in 2021 and available here: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/00207020211016451

Article abstract:

Igor Gouzenko’s defection might have been the first – and most famous – of the Cold War in Canada, but it was hardly the last. A number of records recently opened after Access to Information Act requests made by the Canadian Foreign Intelligence History Project casts brighter light on this aspect of Canada’s intelligence history. This article offers an overview of how the Government of Canada established its policy to manage defection and those who defected. It offers a number of possible leads for future research projects, some of which, but not all of which, will require the release of further material, whether under the Access to Information Act or a broader declassification framework from the Government of Canada.

The primary documents on this site were requested and made available by the Canadian Foreign Intelligence History Project. Fore more information about CFIHP, please visit https://carleton.ca/csids/canadian-foreign-intelligence-history-project/.

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RCMP Special Branch Lectures

Lectures given to the No. 1 Special Branch Class at Headquarters, Ottawa, in July 1953.

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The Corby Case (Igor Gouzenko)

Records released under the Access to Information Act related to Igor Gouzenko and the Corby Case.